7 Days In New York by Tompi

A quick overview about this photobook: Captured by the photographer/musician/doctor, Tompi, this book is compiled with a series of both film and colored pictures taken in New York City, USA. The skilled artist had managed to successfully depict the lively surroundings that happened along his late visit to the city that never sleeps, revealing the untold stories he shared within each shot.

Now in retrospect, I do not have an excellent background when it comes to holding a camera, let alone a remarkable skill towards street photography, so a slight warning to everyone who reads, I just wanted to let you guys know that this review comes only from the eye-viewed lens of a person who isn’t as much as half amazing compared to an average photographer, but still generally knows a thing or two about it. With that being said, let’s just go ahead and jump right into it.

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So, wow. New York City, The Big Apple. The thought of visiting this somewhat audacious city someday was merely a dream until I finally wandered around to meeting this book. It was almost as if I was there, witnessing the New Yorkers’ lives right before my very eyes within the turn of every page. Each picture got me in awe. The shots were glorious. Eye-pleasing. Aesthetic. Tompi never ceased to disappoint when the time comes for him to put his impressive versatility to use.

What I absolutely admire most about street photography is that it’s pretty dang spontaneous, right on the spot, where chances are the events that occur might not ever be similar to the next few things that happen for the next few seconds. You can never tame the objects that move right before your lens and from there, you’ll find the mobility of life in the most relatively outspoken way possible.

I love, love, love the fact that Tompi had chosen to set foot on New York for his bold street photography hunt, though I must admit, that the reason mainly revolves around me being a huge fan of the city itself, but really, though, why wouldn’t you choose to capture the lives of Manhattanites? The city where dreams are made of, where inspiration flows like the currents of a river, and valiant histories are born. I couldn’t have chosen a better location myself.

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Several of his shots involved elements like shadows and majorities in darkness that beautifully stood out the minority of brightness in the area where the pictures were mostly taken, which I personally think is very interesting to see because you don’t get to know what really happens in the picture, but instead you are allowed to analyze and make speculations on your own regarding to what’s happening inside of it.

There were also a lot of play in out of focus, where the pictures were mainly a spotlight on what a New Yorker was currently doing at the time which was also a remarkable craft towards the art of street photography itself.

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The landscape pictures were also as breathtaking as the other ones as well, because truth be told, you guys, becoming such a dork when it comes to New York myself, I’ve always enjoyed watching the skyscrapers in Times Square and Manhattan, or just downtown New York decorated with busy crowds that indirectly becomes the icon of the busy city itself through movie settings and images on tumblr, assuming the obvious fact that everybody from everywhere would also enjoy viewing it as much as I do.

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I think what Tompi is trying to show us through these pictures are the series of the average restless everyday life events of the people in New York that goes offhand, the mobilized citizens that distinctively represents the empire state of mind that is done so well to the point where it captivated the pairs of eyes, of a photographer or whatnot, that viewed through these set of images beforehand.

Here’s one that I would mark as my favorite photo throughout this entire album:

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The reason why this picture shined a little brighter than others is that, in my defense, it had such a strong potential of showing a range of animated components. The first element that caught my eye was the 3 Asian (not to be crude or anything because I too happen to be one myself) people taking a selfie under the bridge, declaring diversity upon New York, and not only that, see those jumbotron ads there on the upper corner to the right? As you all may look closer, one of them is practically written in Arabian, which conducts another oblivious fact that New York preserves such a diverse set of humanity that understands not only English, but a mixture of other languages communicating indubitable content as well. Let’s not forget about the slow speed technique he used capturing the moment being shown on the car next to the Asians, revealing the legitimate fact that it’s still there and still moving more rapidly compared to the other elements in this picture.

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In the end, I find myself really appreciating what Tompi has to offer by scanning through the pages of this deluxe looking masterpiece. Tompi empowered me to see New York on a very contrast angle by maximizing his skilled techniques he successfully brought to the table within each picture imparted throughout this book, and I certainly will without a doubt look forward to his next new releases sometime in the near-end future.

So what did you guys overall think of this post? Do you happen to have a similar interest to photography as well? What are your thoughts on Tompi’s latest hunt for street photography in New York? Do leave a comment down below to let me know!

from the writer who will also soon find herself strolling the streets of Manhattan,

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